Chicken soup to cure a cold

This chicken soup recipe is bound to help you beat a winter cold.

The following recipe was provided by Sally Fallon, writing for the Weston A. Price Foundation.

You've undoubtedly heard the old adage that chicken soup will help cure a cold, and there's scientific support for such a statement.

For starters, chicken contains a natural amino acid called cysteine, which can thin the mucus in your lungs and make it less sticky so you can expel it more easily. Processed, canned soups will not work as well as the homemade version made from slow-cooked bone broth.

For best results, you really need to make up a fresh batch yourself (or ask a friend or family member to do so). If combating a cold, make the soup hot and spicy with plenty of pepper. The spices will trigger a sudden release of watery fluids in your mouth, throat, and lungs, which will help thin down the respiratory mucus so it's easier to expel.
Stock contains minerals in a form the body can absorb easily—not just calcium but also magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, sulphur and trace minerals. It contains the broken down material from cartilage and tendons--stuff like chondroitin sulphates and glucosamine, now sold as expensive supplements for arthritis and joint pain.

Ingredients for homemade chicken broth
1 whole free-range chicken
4 L cold filtered water
2 tablespoons Apple Cider vinegar
1 large onion, coarsely chopped
2 carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped
3 celery stalks, coarsely chopped
1 bunch parsley
Any other soup veggies you have in your fridge, such as cabbage. 
Please note the addition of vinegar. Not only are fats ideal when combined with acids like vinegar, but when it comes to making broth, the vinegar helps leech all those valuable minerals from the bones into the stockpot water, which is ultimately what you'll be eating. The goal is to extract as many minerals as possible out of the bones into the broth water. Bragg's raw apple cider vinegar is a good choice as it's unfiltered and unpasteurized.

Cooking directions
There are lots of different ways to make bone broth, and there really isn't a wrong way. You can find different variations online. Here, I'll offer some basic directions. If you're starting out with a whole chicken, you'll of course have plenty of meat as well, which can be added back into the broth later with extra herbs and spices to make a chicken soup. I also use it on my salad.
1.    Fill up a large stockpot (or large crockpot) with pure, filtered water. (A crockpot is recommended for safety reasons if you have to leave home while it's cooking.)
2.    Add vinegar and all vegetables except parsley to the water.
3.    Place the whole chicken or chicken carcass into the pot.
4.    Bring to a boil, and remove any scum that rises to the top.
5.    Reduce the heat to the lowest setting and let simmer.
6.    If cooking a whole chicken, the meat should start separating from the bone after about 2 hours. Simply remove the chicken from the pot and separate the meat from the bones. Place the carcass back into the pot and continue simmering the bones for another 12-24 hours and follow with step 8 and 9.
7.    If cooking bones only, simply let them simmer for about 24 hours.
8.    Add the fresh parsley about 10 minutes before finishing the stock, as this will add healthy mineral ions to your broth.
9.    Remove remaining bones from the broth with a slotted spoon and strain the rest through a strainer to remove any bone fragments.

Note: You can also make this recipe using beef bones. Just tell your butcher you want to make stock and ask for any big tubular bones.

Tenar Larsen Roberts

Tenar Larsen Roberts is the Founder & Director of The Lifestylers Co.

The Lifestylers Co (TLC) provides Health and Lifestyle consulting services for companies and individuals across Sydney.TLC is a community of people, brands & products that enable their clients to lead happier, healthier lives with less stress and more time to do good things!
Tenar is a certified Life Coach, a recognised Sports & Exercise Nutrition Coach with Precision Nutrition & holds a Master Trainer Qualification from the Australian Institute of Fitness. Tenar combines her training in the areas of food, movement and mindset to deliver truly holistic, outcome-based solutions.
Find out more about what TLC offers or contact Tenar directly